Project-itis

Project-itis: when there is a wall of projects higher than you can shake a stick at, and yet you want to start more projects.

Project-itis: when there is a wall of projects higher than you can shake a stick at, and yet you want to start more projects.

I have the -itis. Project-itis, that is. It’s a knitter’s affliction where you have way too many works-in-progress (WIPs). I’m not sure what a respectable number is – two, perhaps three. I bet you, though, it’s not 10. Or more. Which is probably what I have going on.

In self defense, or in an attempt to justify the quantity of existing projects, I will say it’s because they’re in various stages of design. Not because I’m a project addict, of course. They’re not all huge projects. After all, there is only so much budget for yarn. Although there is an awful lot of stash yarn available for smaller projects. There’s also enough yarn to make at least 3 sweaters. I should probably list left over project yarn, unused skeins, for sale on Ravelry or somewhere, but that’s probably a post for another time.

I’m not sure where the -itis comes from. A flurry of ideas, for sure, and an impatience to see them come to light. But there are only so many knitting hours in a day and they can linger in various stages of completion for a long, long time. Like knitting purgatory. I like to have different projects in different gauges to help mix it up for my wrists. That’s another justification.

And then another key symptom of the -itis is the nearly unstoppable desire to start more projects. No, I tell myself firmly. Again and again. It’s working, barely. For now. I tell myself that there’s at least two sweaters in the works that need finishing, and a myriad array of smaller projects.

I’m having a flare-up of the -itis because I just finished a sweater. Oh boy, I think gleefully, I can start something else! Damn you, -itis. You’ve got me again. No.

So I am trying to steel my resolve and focus on completing something. I admit I did have a bit of a slip up the other day and started a hat. I couldn’t help it. It was just little, after all, and it would only take a couple of days to complete, right? What’s the harm in that?

I might have a problem.

Do you suffer from project-itis? Or do you exercise more self-discipline than I do?

x Rena

Unknitting

IMG_1256

Yesterday I spent waaaay more time unknitting than knitting, which served as a reminder that in designing, sometimes you need to go backward in order to go forward. Even so, I was amazed at how long it took. I undid a long edge that had already been bound off, using a tubular cast off, which was much more time consuming than doing the bind off in the first place. What really helped was using my tapestry needle to help find the woven in ends and loosen bind off stitches as I went.

IMG_1254After a long time, I made it to the stockinette fabric. I had alternated skeins, so I needed to frog a couple of rows, then switch, and frog with the second skein. Whee. This also took way longer than I thought it would. But I got to where I needed to go, and knitted once more. Which I thought initially was going well, until I realized I was knitting the wrong pattern. Ha. So then I had to do some proper unknitting using my needles. Without twisting my stitches. Tricky. Yet again, I did get to where I needed to go. Third time lucky, everything seems okay now. But really, my shenanigans took the better part of a day and I was happy that I could work on my project out on the patio. Which kind of looks like this:

Rena in the garden 2013

…except with piles of knitting all around me, which I bet you can imagine what that looks like.

And guess what I get to do today? We meet again, tubular bind off. I’ll be out there soon, concentrating very hard.

x Rena